THE SONG OF TRIUMPHANT LOVE

Ivan S. Turgenev

 
 
 
[……] ‘But when Muzzio began the last song, it suddenly gained force and rang out tunefully and powerfully; the passionate melody flowed out under the wide sweeps of the bow, flowed out, exquisitely twisting and coiling like the snake that covered the violin-top; and such fire, such triumphant bliss glowed and burned in this melody that Fabio and Valeria felt wrung to the heart and tears came into their eyes; … while Muzzio, his head bent, and pressed close to the violin, his cheeks pale, his eyebrows drawn together into a single straight line, seemed still more concentrated and solemn; and the diamond at the end of the bow flashed sparks of light as though it too were kindled by the fire of the divine song. When Muzzio had finished, and still keeping fast the violin between his chin and his shoulder, dropped the hand that held the bow, ‘What is that? What is that you have been playing to us?’ cried Fabio. Valeria uttered not a word- but her whole being seemed echoing her husband’s question. Muzzio laid the violin on the table–and slightly tossing back his hair, he said with a polite smile: ‘That–that melody … that song I heard once in the island of Ceylon. That song is known there among the people as the song of happy, triumphant love.’  Play it again,’ Fabio was murmuring. ‘No; it can’t be played again,’ answered Muzzio.’
 
CHAUSSON Poème Op.25 – Gidon Kremer, LSO, R.Chailly, 1980
‘One fine autumn day, Fabio was putting the last touches to his picture of his Cecilia; Valeria sat at the organ, her fingers straying at random over  the keys. Suddenly, without her knowing it, from under her hands came the first notes of that song of triumphant love which Muzzio had once played; and at the same instant, for the first time since her marriage, she  felt within her the throb of a new palpitating life. Valeria started, stopped….What did it mean? Could it be….’
Kogan plays Chausson (Poeme Op.25)
Chausson was inspired to write «Poème» after reading a short story by Ivan Turgenev (1818-1883), entitled «The Song of Triumphant Love.» The power and emotional aura of Chausson’s music take first-timers by surprise. He wrote a few searching songs, a handful of prized chamber pieces, the most individual symphony in the French tradition, an epic and mystical opera about King Arthur, and a Poème for violin which, thanks to the career needs of virtuosos, is almost well known.
Jascha Heifetz – Poeme (Ernest Chausson)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ONRhjWM3HpA&feature=youtu.be
Sketches for this vocal work are contained in Tchaikovsky’s Notebook for 1887. The composer’s diary entry for 1/13 February 1887 mentions that he was reading Turgenev’s short story of the same name.
The words do not appear in the musical sketch. Sketches for this vocal work are contained in Tchaikovsky’s Notebook for 1887. The composer’s diary entry for 1/13 February 1887 mentions that he was reading Turgenev’s short story of the same name.The words do not appear in the musical sketch.
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The Song of Triumphant Love by Ivan S. Turgenev
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